Bestes android game

bestes android game

6. Juni In der ersten Jahreshälfte sind zahlreiche neue coole Android-Spiele erschienen. Welche die besten sind und was Dich erwartet, erfährst Du. Das neue kostenlose Spiel "Pokémon Duel" für Ihr Android-Gerät lässt Sie mit den kleinen Taschenmonstern taktisch anspruchsvolle Duelle austragen. Derzeit . Aug. Was sind die besten Spiele für Android? Natürlich Neue und vor allem die, die noch unverbrauchten Spielspaß bieten. In unserer Liste haben.

You have to carefully manoeuvre through dangerous situations and manage resources as you navigate the stars -- because when your astronaut dies, it's game over.

And all the while, you have no way of knowing if what you seek is truly the way home. Before Pokemon Go hit the scene, Ingress was Niantic's best known augmented-reality game.

Join up with The Enlightened or The Resistance team and play with users all around you. Play a medieval monarch and try rule without destroying your family's dynasty.

The game style is a bit like Tinder: You swipe left or right on your subjects' many requests and try to bring order and balance to your kingdom.

This game was the first time in my life that I found myself saying, "Heck yeah, necrosis! You control an epidemic and your aim is to spread it throughout the world and kill everyone before humanity can develop a cure.

You have a variety of tools at your disposal to mutate your virus: Each of these can be built up in trees that interconnect, making your virus strong and, as your virus spreads, you gain DNA points that you can spend on more abilities.

You can watch the effects in a newsfeed, such as "Australia burning corpses" and "France removes drug research safeguards". It's tremendously exciting, especially when your virus grows strong enough to mutate on its own, as you race against the development of a cure.

It's based on a real-world simulation, too. Fireproof's The Room series is, everyone can agree, one of the most spectacular puzzle series ever produced on any platform.

Now that the third game is out, I can confidently say that they've been growing in both scope and complexity as the series progresses.

The basic format remains the same throughout: Solve a series of puzzle objects to progress to the next puzzle and small piece of the story. All three games in the series hit that brilliant, elusive spot between mentally challenging and satisfying.

And they're gorgeously tactile, beautifully designed down to the finest detail. I recommend full immersion: A dark room, a pair of headphones and no other distractions.

I don't think I've ever seen a real-time strategy game as pared down as rymdkapsel. It's as much about battles as it is about building and exploration and every aspect of the game is as minimalist as it gets.

You're in deep space and have to build a base using tetromino-shaped tiles, laying them down in a tight configuration to make sure you maximize resources.

Meanwhile, you have to explore and mine the surrounding monoliths, while defending against enemy attack.

There's only one type of unit to build and three resource types. So instead of complexity, you have to focus on planning out the best possible base to get everything done as efficiently and minimally as possible.

It's an absolutely perfect RTS design for mobile. This turn-based strategy game shares some similarities with Civilization, but simplifies the concept into a great Android game.

Pick from several different races with different strengths and weaknesses and then slowly take over the world as you upgrade your technologies, unlock new units, and bring your opponents to their knees.

The game comes with a few races to choose from, but you can get more through in-app purchases. Don't worry to much about learning curve because the game helps you learn the ropes as you play, but you'll soon figure out the best way to capture territory and go for the highest scores.

You can play alone against the AI or against your friends. One of the best things about the game is you can play a single player game in under 30 minutes.

Overall, the Battle for Polytopia is simply a great way to get your strategy gaming fix on mobile. Like its predecessor , You Must Build a Boat is graphically raw, but it's nevertheless pretty danged close to a perfect mobile game experience.

It mixes a tile-matching casual game with a dungeon crawler to excellent effect. The premise is that you need to, well, build a boat, by collecting supplies and monsters to serve as crew.

Each run, you have to try and last as long as you can by sliding rows and columns to match attacks, shields, keys and other items to help you face the perils ahead.

The gameplay keeps you keen with quests to upgrade your gear and boat. The end goal is to complete your boat and get out -- just as the goal in was to reach the 10,, points needed for freedom.

You'll play a valet named Passepartout and must pick a path from city to city. Oh, and you can travel around the 3D globe on a mechanical camel. Xenowerk is a top-down, dual-stick shooter that has you blowing away mutants in the aftermath of a science experiment gone horribly wrong.

You'll need to go deeper and deeper into multiple levels of an underground science facility as you shoot your way to objectives, grab new weapons and make your way to the exit.

You also have a number of extra skills that do things like freeze your enemies to slow them down and heal yourself when the heat gets to be too much.

The eerie soundtrack and dark levels -- with only your flashlight to guide you -- make this game scarier than most, but the lighting effects and near constant action make it perfect for action gaming fans.

Check out Vainglory if you're big into PvP multiplayer battle arena games. Play quick-match games or lengthier battles, depending on how much time you have to spare.

There are over 30 characters to choose from and comes at the low price of free. So it's definitely worth checking out.

I was a big fan of the original Hero Academy when it came out a few years ago because you could choose between uniquely different armies and go to battle with your friends in asynchronous, turn-based combat.

Hero Academy 2 improves upon the original with more polished animations and graphics, new challenges that keep gameplay interesting and new "decks" you can earn or buy to try out different armies.

I've only just started to explore the game, but it's already tons of fun just like the original. Slayaway Camp is, at its core, a Sokoban-style puzzler, but it's what's wrapped around that core gameplay that makes it brilliant.

You play the villain in a series of slasher movies and you need to hit and slay! The graphics are voxel-based, which keeps the gore-fest entertainingly cartoony and every detail has been lovingly designed -- from the "rewind" option when you fall to the scattered bones you leave in your wake.

Some levels have limits or special features such as fires to help you dispatch your victims -- but be warned, they also provide hazards that you need to avoid yourself.

You can also earn coins to unlock special kills. For such a bloodthirsty premise, it's an utter joy. This Tomb Raider-themed puzzle game game is similar in style to the runaway hit Hitman Go, a strategy game in which you move Agent 47 around a board to take out targets without them seeing you.

In Lara Croft Go, the experience is more complex: Not only do you have to take out enemies from behind or the side, you have to navigate crumbling ruins and solve obstacle mazes.

Luckily the move counter has been removed so you can take your time. And each level is short enough that you don't lose too much time if you have to start again.

It's a fresh new take that manages to capture the old-school spirit of the original Tomb Raider. And since it doesn't require an internet connection to play, it's great for plane rides.

You're going to die in Don't Starve. You're going to die a lot. An inventor and scientist kicked out of your safe, warm home, you have to rely on your wits and the landscape to build the means to stay alive as long as you possibly can.

The dark can kill you. Spiders can kill you. Hunger and fear can kill you. Each day, you must gather materials to survive the night, while making sure you get enough to eat, while resources such as grass, stones and wood allow you to craft materials.

When you die, it's game over and back to the beginning to start all over again. It's brutal, tense and rewarding.

Plus it's art seems inspired by a mix of Tim Burton and Edward Gorey, which is like human catnip to me. Crashlands is kind of like Don't Starve for people who got frustrated by the unforgiving survival elements.

You're a space truck driver who's crash landed on an alien planet. You have to gather resources, build a base and gradually craft your way to getting off-world.

It's not all aimless, though. As you progress through the game, you'll find yourself fulfilling quests.

This marks it further apart from Don't Starve, which is more or less a sandbox game with the aim being to stay alive as long as possible.

With no such constraints you can die in Crashlands, but you respawn without losing anything , the game becomes a very different prospect, less fraught with careful conservation of resources and more guided and combative.

It is, however, massively fun. If you were a fan of terrific game Rayman Origins, then it's worth checking out the sequel Rayman: Help save the enchanted forest by recovering the ancient stolen eggs.

This game is great for kids in particular, but adults will probably enjoy it too. Words can't possibly do Framed justice: It really is one of the more unusual concepts I've seen in some time.

The entire game takes place in a wordless noir comic. Our protagonists avoid being spotted by law while double-crossing each other. Gameplay is not action-based, but context-based: You have to examine each page, shifting the panels around to make sure events occur in the order that sees our hero escape clean, getting the jump on police or sneaking past.

Although it may sound good, that's nothing compared to how magnificent it is to experience. And yes, a pair of headphones for the soundtrack is an absolute must.

A sequel, Framed 2 , is coming soon to Android. The tower defense market on mobile, one could argue, is fairly glutted. But if you have just one TD game or game series on your device, it's really hard to look past any of the three games in the Kingdom Rush series.

They're a few years old now, but they're still about as good as the genre gets. The first game, just called Kingdom Rush, is free, so you can test the waters before diving all the way in.

If you like the style of tower defense the Kingdom Rush series does so well, you'll definitely like Iron Marines. This game is a newer effort from the same people, Ironhide Game Studio, and takes much of the same great action into the future.

Instead of knights and archers, you'll be playing with futuristic soldiers and snipers. Fight aliens and mechas as you strategize the best way to beat the level at hand.

But what's cool about this version, is there is even more focus on special characters -- individual heroes with unique abilities you can bring along for the fight with your other units.

If you've always wished you could play Starcraft on your iPhone or iPad, Iron Marines is your best bet. It turns out that building and managing train lines is a pretty tricky thing to do, at least if Mini Metro is any indication.

It tasks you with building lines based on the metro map as designed by Harry Beck in You have to build lines to transport passengers, which indicate their destination with symbols that match stops.

You'll also use your limited resources to supply extra carriages and trains to more populous lines and build bridges to more remote stops.

It will definitely challenge your strategic planning skills. The mobile format is perfect for digitizing card games. And if you're looking for the best collectible card game experience, you can't go past Hearthstone, produced with all the polish and shine Blizzard can muster.

The game is based on World of Warcraft, and each of the nine classes has a deck based on its WoW equivalent, which allows for a variety of play styles.

There are also meaty single-player and competitive multiplayer options, so it's perfect for a quick play or something more in-depth.

In short, it's extremely versatile and you can play it however you like. It's hard to imagine a more perfect digital CCG experience.

You can read our analysis of what makes it so great here. From the developer behind Little Inferno and set in the same world comes Human Resource Machine, a game that tasks you with using basic programming to conduct menial office tasks.

It's pretty easy to understand the gameplay, but will really make you think about the best order in which to automate a task.

This makes it an awesome introduction to programming, a fun game for programming types or just a standalone puzzle game for those who don't wish to take it further.

And, of course, there's a wonderfully sinister story that unfolds as the game progresses…. Fans of point-and-click adventures, hand-drawn graphics and artistically adventurous indie games, look no further.

Machinarium is a gorgeously rendered journey through an ominous universe where the answers to the puzzles presented aren't immediately obvious.

Leo's Fortune is visually stunning platform based game where you chase down a thief who stole your gold.

Simply slide from left to right through the 24 puzzle-based levels. This adventure game had CNET writers absolutely hooked.

In the first half of , a free flash game on the web turned into a viral craze. It was called and here's the thing: It was a clone of a much more thoughtful game released a month earlier called Threes!

The premise of Threes! Pair matching numbers, starting with threes. Your base units are ones and twos, which you can push together to create a three.

From there, you have to place matching numbers next to each other, then push them together to create a single, doubled number. The idea is to get the number higher and higher, until you hit the highest number achievable in the game -- -- on a 4-by-4 grid.

It seems simple, but the gameplay has been very carefully balanced to provide a challenge and progression, capturing that elusive " Beholder deserves a place of honour alongside brilliant dystopian titles such as Replica , Papers, Please and This War of Mine.

As landlord over a block of apartments in a totalitarian state, you oversee the tenants -- quite literally your job is to spy on them for the government.

You can choose to play by the government's rules or covertly help the people under your care, but at great risk. Every action has consequences with high stakes and multiple endings to unlock.

Tinytouchtales' game Card Crawl combined a roguelike dungeon crawler with a solitaire-style card game. As the eponymous thief, you need to learn how to make the most of shadows, take out foes, steal treasure and make your escape.

It sounds simple, but it's a game of richness and depth that slowly unfolds into something beautiful.

Hocus is a game that takes a cue or two from Monument Valley, then moves in its own fascinating direction.

It's pared the experience right back to a puzzle game based on Escher-style illusions. Each level consists of an impossible shape, with a red block and a red hole.

The aim is to move the block around the shape and get it into the hole, working with the odd twists in perspective. There are no penalties, no timers and the result is a soothing series of puzzles.

Asmodee Digital is building a solid little stable of board and card games ported to mobile. Onirim is a single-player card game, but it's probably not like any other solitaire game you've ever played.

Each selected letter blasts a line across the grid; where lines meet become solid areas filled with your word. The aim is to fill the grid. On smaller levels, this is simple, but larger grids can be challenging — especially when you realize a massive word that on discovery made you feel like a genius leaves spaces that are impossible to fill.

Two for the price of one, then — and both games alone are worth the outlay. It comes across a bit like a mash-up of Mini Metro and Flight Control.

When your road system gets jammed, your only option is to start from scratch and try something new.

Otherwise, Freeways is a blast. Card Crawl mixes solitaire and dungeon crawling, and does an awful lot with a four-by-two grid of cards. In each round, an armor-clad ogre deals four cards, which may include monsters, weaponry, potions, and spells.

To progress to the next draw, you must use three of the cards dealt to you. For example, you might grab a sword, use that to kill a demonic crow, and then quaff a potion.

Getting through the entire deck requires strategy more than luck. Generously, the basic game is free; but we recommend buying the one-off IAP to unlock the full set of cards and game modes.

Miracle Merchant has you mix potions for thirsty adventurers, fashioned from stacks of colored cards. Each customer asks for a specific ingredient, and mentions another they like.

Across 13 rounds, you must manage your deck to ensure everyone goes away happy. Fail once and your game ends. Combinations prove vital for success: Linelight is a gorgeous, minimal puzzler that pits you against the rhythmic denizens of a network of lines levitating above a colored haze.

Your aim is simply to progress, inching your way along the network, triggering gates and switches, and collecting golden gems.

Early puzzles are content to let you get to grips with the virtual stick one of the best on Android. As you tap the left or right of the screen, he briefly flaps in that direction before gravity does its thing.

Fortunately, you can fight back. Smacking into a demon destroys it. Some demons spit out loot when they expire, enabling you to power-up your owl in its subsequent lives.

As its name suggests, there are no virtual D-pads to contend with. Instead, as the aliens menacingly descend towards your planet, you tap their general location to fling something destructive their way.

Your weapons need time to recharge, and specific armaments work well against certain foes. In a sense, it all plays out like a strategy-laced precision shooter on fast-forward, with you clocking incoming hostiles, quickly switching to the best weapon, and tapping or swiping to blow them away.

There are just 30 levels in all, but only the very best arcade veterans are likely to blaze through them at any speed — and even then, getting all the achievements is a tough ask.

Super Samurai Rampage is a manic swipe-based high-score chaser, featuring a samurai who has - for some reason - been provoked into a relentless rampage.

Said rampage is dependent on you swiping. Swipe left and you lunge in that direction, slicing your sword through the air. Swipe up and you majestically leap, whereupon you can repeatedly swipe every which way, fashioning a flurry of airborne destruction akin to the most outlandish of martial arts movies.

The basics are simple: Your blue pyramid must nudge colored pyramids onto matching triangular spaces. Even early levels can stump, until you hit upon the precise combination of moves required to achieve your goal.

First Strike is an oddball combination of territory-snagging board game Risk, and classic defense arcade title Missile Command.

You pick a nuclear power and set about building missiles, researching technologies, annexing adjacent states, and — when it comes to it — blowing the living daylights out of your enemies.

The high-tech interface balances speed and accessibility, although games tend to be surprisingly lengthy — and initially sedate, as you gradually increase your arsenal, and shore up your defenses.

Eventually, all hell breaks lose, including terrifying first strikes, where enemies lob their entire cache of missiles at an unlucky target.

The first two Riptide games had you zoom along undulating watery circuits surrounded by gleaming metal towers. Renegade offers another slice of splashy futuristic racing, but this time finds you immersed in the seedy underbelly of the sport.

Sensible racers get nothing. The career mode finds you earning cash, upgrading your ride, and probably ignoring the slightly tiresome story bits.

The racing, though, is superb — an exhilarating mix of old-school arcade thrills and modern mobile touchscreen smarts. Samorost 3 is a love letter to classic point-and-click adventure games.

You explore your surroundings, unearth objects, and then figure out where best to use them. The storyline is bonkers, involving a mad monk who used a massive mechanical hydra to smash up a load of planetoids.

You, as an ambitious space-obsessed gnome, must figure out how to set things right. Just two magical moments among many in one of the finest examples of adventuring on Android.

Mushroom 11 finds you exploring the decaying ruins of a devastated world. And you do so as a blob of green goo.

Over time, you learn how this can urge the blob to move in certain ways, or how you can split it in two, so half can flick a switch, while the other half moves onward.

This probably sounds a bit weird — and it is. But Mushroom 11 is perfectly suited to the touchscreen. There are moments of frustration — the odd difficulty wall.

But with regular restart points, and countless ingenious obstacles and puzzles, Mushroom 11 is a strange creature you should immediately squeeze into whatever space exists on your Android device.

In the late s, Space Invaders invited you to blast rows of invaders. In the mids, Arkanoid revamped Breakout, having you use a bat-like spaceship to belt a ball at space bricks.

Now, Arkanoid vs Space Invaders mashes the two titles together — and, surprisingly, it works very nicely. Now and again, Arkanoid is recalled more directly in a special attack that has you belt a ball around the place after firing it into action using a massive space bow.

Increasingly, though, the game is laced with strategy, since your real enemy is time. In platform adventure The Big Journey , fat cat Mr.

Whiskers is on a mission. The chef behind his favorite dumplings has disappeared, and so the brave feline sets out to find him.

The journey finds the chubby kitty rolling and leaping across — and through — all kinds of vibrant landscapes, packed with hills, tunnels, and enemies.

But The Big Journey very much has its own character, not least in the knowing humor peppered throughout what might otherwise have been a saccharine child-like storyline about a gluttonous cartoon cat.

You play as Ruth, a young woman living on a remote farm in a s Norwegian fjord. She makes dairy products, sold to a town several hours away.

Then, without warning, a massive gold spaceship descends, stealing her cows. To say much more would spoil things, but we can say that this old-school adventure is a very pleasant way to spend a few hours.

The puzzles are logical yet satisfying; the visuals are gorgeous; and the game amusingly provides all of its narrative in rhyme, which is pleasingly quaint and nicely different.

Hero of the hour Dennis finds himself unicycling naked in this gorgeous platform game best described as flat-out nuts.

In iCycle , you dodder left or right, leap over obstacles, and break your fall with a handy umbrella, all the while attempting to grab ice as surreal landscapes collapse and morph around you.

The puzzling is more variable. The quest to locate your kidnapped grandfather requires defeating numerous logic puzzles. Anyone who thought Nintendo would convert a standard handheld take on Mario to Android was always on a hiding to nothing.

Still, really smart level design wins the day, and completists will have fun replaying the world tour mode time and again to collect the many hard-to-reach coins.

But somehow Card Thief cleverly mashes up cards and sneaking about. The game takes place on a three-by-three grid of cards. For each move, you plan a route to avoid getting duffed up by guards although pickpocketing them on the way past is fair game, obviously , loot a chest, and make for an exit.

Card Thief is not the easiest game to get into, with its lengthy tutorial and weird spin on cards. But this is a game with plenty of nuance and depth that becomes increasingly rewarding the more you play, gradually unlocking its secrets.

There are so many questions there not least: That game where you cast a shadow on the wall and attempt to make a vaguely recognizable rabbit?

The game looks gorgeous, with stunning lighting effects and objects that look genuinely real as they dangle in the air. Mostly though, this is a game about tactility and contemplation — it begs to be explored, and to make use of your digits in a way virtual D-pads could never hope to compete with.

You might have played enough automatic runners to last several lifetimes, but Chameleon Run nonetheless deserves to be on your Android device.

Each level has been meticulously designed, which elevates Chameleon Run beyond its algorithmically generated contemporaries.

Like the best platform games, you must commit every platform and gap to memory to succeed. With the latter, you can smash your head into a platform above to give you one more chance to leap forward and not tumble into the void.

Bereft of a story, the game simply tasks you with guiding a trundling cube to the end of each blocky level. Along the way, you grab tiny glowing cubes.

On reaching the goal, you get graded on your abilities. The isometric visuals are sharp, and the head-bobbing soundtrack urges you onwards. The level design is the real star, though, with surprisingly imaginative objectives and hazards hewn from the isometric landscape.

Try out the level demo. Grab Edge Extended , which is every bit as good as the original. Harking back to classic side-on platformers, Traps n' Gemstones dumps an Indiana Jones wannabe into a massive pyramid, filled with mummies, spiders and traps; from here he must figure out how to steal all the bling, uncover all the secrets, and then finally escape.

Beyond having you leap about, grab diamonds, and keep indigenous explorer-killing critters at bay, Traps n' Gemstones is keen to have you explore.

Get killed and you can carry on from where you left off. More of a hardcore player? You awake to find a letter from your father, who it turns out has gone from your life.

You get a chapter for free, to test how the game works on your device its visual clout means fairly powerful Android devices are recommended ; a single IAP unlocks the rest.

In this compelling and unique puzzle game, you control the actions of a worker drone by way of programming-like sequences.

These are arranged via drag and drop on a board at the right-hand side of the screen. Much like Boulder Dash, Captain Cowboy is mostly about not being crushed by massive rocks — you dig paths through dirt, aiming to strategically use boulders to take out threats rather than your own head.

But everything here is played out without stress due to endless continues and sometimes in slow motion when floating through zero-gravity sections of space.

Tension is replaced by exploration, and single-screen arcade thrills are sacrificed for a longer game. In the fantasy world of Solitairica , battles are fought to the death by way of cards.

Then there are spells you cast by way of collected energies. Meanwhile, the creatures strike back with their own unique attacks, from strange worm-like beings nibbling your head, to grumpy forest dwellers making your cards grow beards.

In short, then, a modicum of fantasy role-playing wrapped around an entertaining and approachable card game. And on Android, you have the advantage of the game being free — a one-off IAP only figures if you want to avoid watching adverts, and have access to alternate decks to try your luck as a different character.

For a game that eventually pushes your observation skills, precision and nerve to breaking point, Linia is almost absurdly easy at first.

The aim is to spear them in order, by slicing through shapes below. This is simple enough when the shapes are static.

The end result is kind of a minimal, artistic, exactness-obsessed take on Fruit Ninja. Anyone expecting the kind of free-roaming racing from the console versions of this title are going to be miffed, but Need for Speed: Most Wanted is nonetheless one of the finest games of its kind on Android.

Yes, the tracks are linear, with only the odd shortcut, but the actual racing bit is superb. You belt along the seedy streets of a drab, gray city, trying to win events that will boost your ego and reputation alike.

Wins swell your coffers, enabling you to buy new vehicles for entering special events. The game looks gorgeous on Android and has a high-octane soundtrack to urge you onwards.

It reimagines the console stealth shooter as a dinky clockwork boardgame. Agent 47 scoots about, aiming to literally knock enemies off the board, and then reach and bump off his primary target.

And the puzzles are well designed, too, with distinct objectives that often require multiple solutions to be found. You have to feel for the little beastie in Badland 2.

Having somehow survived all manner of horrors last time round, the winged critter is now hurled into an even deadlier circle of hell. As before, the aim is to reach an exit, avoiding traps such as massive saw-blades, bubbling magma, and flamethrowers belching toasty death in all directions.

Your means of survival is mostly to flap a bit. This time, though, rather than prod the screen to flap rightwards, you can flap left or right, which comes in handy for navigating deranged levels that now scroll in all directions.

There's perhaps a lack of freshness in this sequel, despite such new tricks and a smattering of unfamiliar traps, but Badland 2 remains a visually stunning and relentlessly cruel arcade experience among the very best on Android.

Do, though, buy the IAP — the atmosphere and momentum is obliterated when ads appear. One of the most exhilarating games on mobile, Impossible Road finds a featureless white ball barreling along a ribbon-like track that twists and turns into the distance.

The aim is survival — and the more gates you pass through, the higher your score. The snag is that Impossible Road is fast , and the track bucks and turns like the unholy marriage of a furious unbroken stallion and a vicious roller-coaster.

You sit before a blank underground map of a major metropolis, and drag out lines between stations that periodically appear.

Little trains then cart passengers about, automatically routing them to their stop, their very movements building a pleasing plinky plonky generative soundtrack.

As your underground grows, though, so does the tension. Should a station become overcrowded, your entire network is closed. Do well enough and you unlock new cities, with unique challenges.

At that point, the row vanishes, and more building space scrolls into view. Much of the strategy lies in clever use of cards, which affect nearby squares — a factory reduces the value of nearby land, for example, but an observatory boosts the local area.

You quickly learn plonking down units without much thought messes up your future prospects. Instead, you must plan in a chess-like manner — even more so when facing off against the computer opponent in brutally difficult head-to-head modes.

There are varied mobile takes on limbless wonder Rayman's platform gaming exploits. The original exists on Android in largely faithful form, but feels ill-suited to touchscreens; and Rayman Adventures dabbles in freemium to the point it leaves a bad taste.

They rethink console-oriented platformers as auto-runners — which might sound reductive. However, this is more about distillation and focus than outright simplification.

Tight level design and an emphasis on timing regarding when to jump, rebound and attack forces you to learn layouts and the perfect moment to trigger actions, in order to get the in-game bling you need to progress.

Both titles are sublime, but Fiesta Run is marginally the better of the two - a clever take on platforming that fizzes with energy, looks fantastic, and feels like it was made for Android rather than a year-old console.

A decidedly dizzying take on platform games, Circa Infinity exists in a sparse world of concentric circles. Your little stick man scoots around the edge of the largest, and a prod of the action button when he's atop a pizza-slice cut-out flips him inside the disc.

Only the next disc may be patrolled by any number of critters intent on ejecting the stick man from their particular circle. The net result is an odd-looking, disorienting arcade title that proves fresh and exhilarating.

With 50 levels and five boss fights, making it to the end of Circa Infinity is a stern challenge; getting there quickly should test even the most hardened mobile gamer.

The Room is a series about mysteries within mysteries. It begins with a box. Fiddling with dials and switches causes things to spring to life elsewhere, and you soon find boxes within the boxes, layers unravelling before you; it's the videogame equivalent of Russian dolls meets carpentry, as breathed into life by a crazed inventor.

Movement remains restricted and on rails, but you're afforded a touch more freedom as you navigate your way through a strange clockwork world.

The Room Three is the most expansive of them all, featuring intricate, clever puzzles, as you attempt to free yourself from The Craftsman and his island of deranged traps and trials.

Get all three games, and play them through in order, preferably in a dark room when rain's pouring down outside for best effect.

It's a terrifying and - ultimately - infuriating experience that will have you toying with the idea of having to go online for walkthroughs until you finally crack the mystery.

In Her Story , you find yourself facing a creaky computer terminal with software designed by a sadist. It soon becomes clear the so-called L.

But the tape's been hacked to bits and is accessible only by keywords; 'helpfully', the system only displays five search results at once.

Naturally, these contrivances exist to force you to play detective, eking out clues from video snippets to work out what to search for next, slowly piecing together the mystery in your brain.

A unique and captivating experience, Her Story will keep even the most remotely curious Android gamer gripped until the enigma is solved.

You probably need to be a bit of a masochist to get the most out of Snakebird , which is one of the most brain-smashingly devious puzzlers we've ever set eyes on.

It doesn't really look or sound the part, frankly - all vibrant colors and strange cartoon 'snakebirds' that make odd noises.

But the claustrophobic floating islands the birds must crawl through, supporting each other often literally in their quest for fruit, are designed very precisely to make you think you've got a way forward, only to thwart you time and time again.

The result is a surprisingly arduous game, but one that's hugely rewarding when you crack a particularly tough level, at which point you'll probably rightly consider yourself some kind of gaming genius.

The difference is FOTONICA has you move through a surreal and delicate Rez-like 3D vector landscape, holding the screen to gain speed, and only soaring into the air when you lift a finger.

Smartly, FOTONICA offers eight very different and finite challenges, enabling you to learn their various multi-level pathways and seek out bonuses to ramp up your high scores.

Get to grips with this dreamlike runner and you can then pit your wits and thumbs against three slowly mutating endless zones. You might narrow your eyes at so-called 'realism' in mobile sports titles, given that this usually means 'a game that looks a bit like when you watch telly'.

But Touchgrind Skate 2 somehow manages to evoke the feel of skateboarding, your fingers becoming tiny legs that urge the board about the screen.

There's a lot going on in Touchgrind Skate 2, and the control system is responsive and intricate, enabling you to perform all manner of tricks.

It's not the most immediate of titles - you really need to not only run through the tutorial but fully master and memorize each step before moving on.

Get to grips with your miniature skateboard and you'll find one of the most fluid and rewarding experiences on mobile. Note that for free you get one park to scoot about in, but others are available via IAP.

The bar's set so low in modern mobile gaming that the word 'premium' has become almost meaningless. But Leo's Fortune bucks the trend, and truly deserves the term.

It's a somewhat old-school side-on platform game, featuring a gruff furball hunting down the thief who stole his gold and then, as is always the way, dropped coins at precise, regular intervals along a lengthy, perilous pathway.

The game is visually stunning, from the protagonist's animation through to the lush, varied backdrops.

The game also frequently shakes things up, varying its pace from Sonic-style loops to precise pixel-perfect leaps. It at times perhaps pushes you a bit too far — late on, we found some sections a bit too finicky and demanding.

But you can have as many cracks at a section as you please, and if you master the entire thing, there's a hardcore speedrun mode that challenges you to complete the entire journey without dying.

You scoot about algorithmically generated single-screen mazes, gobbling down flowers, grabbing a key, and then making a break for the exit. But what makes Forget-Me-Not essential is how alive its tiny dungeons feel.

Your enemies don't just gun for you, but are also out to obliterate each other and, frequently, the walls of the dungeon, reshaping it as you play.

There are tons of superb details to find buried within the game's many modes, and cheapskates can even get on board with the free version , although that locks much of its content away until you've munched enough flowers.

If there was any justice, Forget-Me-Not would have a permanent place at the top of the Google Play charts. It is one of the finest arcade experiences around, not just on Android, but on any platform - old or new.

Giving you a sense of the emptiness and vastness of space, and the risks in exploring the void, isn't easy for a bite-sized survival game, but Last Horizon somehow succeeds.

The idea is to leave your broken world behind, roam the galaxy in your rocket, and 'harvest' living worlds.

Doing so loads information into your terraforming kit, for when you reach your destination. During your journey you battle massive suns, asteroids, black holes, alien lifeforms, and lots of gravity.

And although repeating the first three flights can be a little tiresome if you keep dying hint: If you're fed up with racing games paying more attention to whether the tarmac looks photorealistic rather than how much fun it should be to zoom along at insane speeds, check out Horizon Chase.

This tribute to old-school arcade titles is all about the sheer joy of racing, rather than boring realism. The visuals are vibrant, the soundtrack is jolly and cheesy, and the racing finds you constantly battling your way to the front of an aggressive pack.

Note that Horizon Chase gives you five tracks for free. There's a great sense of freedom from the second you immerse yourself in the strange and futuristic world of Power Hover.

The robot protagonist has been charged with pursuing a thief who's stolen batteries that power the city. The droid therefore grabs a hoverboard and scythes across gorgeous minimal landscapes, such as deserts filled with colossal marching automatons, glittering blue oceans, and a dead grey human city.

In lesser hands, Power Hover could have been utterly forgettable. After all, you're basically tapping left and right to change the direction of a hoverboard, in order to collect batteries and avoid obstacles.

But the production values here are stunning. Power Hover is a visual treat, boasts a fantastic soundtrack, and gives mere hints of a story, enabling your imagination to run wild.

Best of all, the floaty controls are perfect; you might fight them at first, but once they click, Power Hover becomes a hugely rewarding experience.

It turns out what makes a good snowman is three very precisely rolled balls of snow stacked on top of each other. And that's the core of this adorable puzzle game, which has more than a few hints of Towers of Hanoi and Sokoban about it as your little monster goes about building icy friends to hug.

What sets A Good Snowman apart from its many puzzle-game contemporaries on Android is a truly premium nature. You feel that the developer went to great efforts to polish every aspect of the production, from the wonderful animation to puzzles that grow in complexity and deviousness, without you really noticing — until you get stuck on a particularly ferocious one several hours in.

This one's all about the bling - and also the not being crushed to death by falling rocks and dirt. Doug Dug riffs off of Mr Driller, Boulder Dash and Dig Dug, the dwarf protagonist digging deep under the earth on an endless quest for shimmering gems.

Cave-ins aren't the only threat, though - the bowels of the earth happen to be home to a surprising array of deadly monsters.

Some can be squashed and smacked with Doug's spade goodbye, creepy spider! Endlessly replayable and full of character, Doug Dug's also surprisingly relaxing - until the dwarf ends up under tonnes of rubble.

This is one of those 'rub your stomach, pat your head' titles that has you play two games at once. At the top of the screen, it's an endless runner, with your little bloke battling all manner of monsters, and pilfering loot.

The rest of the display houses what's essentially a Bejeweled-style gem-swapper. The key is in matching items so that the running bit goes well - like five swords when you want to get all stabby.

Also, there's the building a boat bit. Once a run ends, you return to your watery home, which gradually acquires new rooms and residents.

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Bestes android game -

Bestimmte Gegenstände können die Punktejagd und das Rennen leichter machen. Mit Vollgas um die Kurve: Hier kommt jeder auf seine Kosten. Entsprechend handelt es sich natürlich auch hier um ein dreidimensionales Puzzle-Spiel mit zwar simpler Grundstory, aber umso mehr Atmosphäre, in die es einzutauchen gilt. Doch Vorsicht, bei jedem Spielzug tauchen neue "2er" auf und verstopfen Ihr Spielquadrat.

Bestes Android Game Video

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